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Sitra revises its strategy and operating model with the aim of becoming a leader in sustainable well-being

By the end of 2012, Sitra will adopt a project-based organizational model focused on the implementation of three themes related to sustainable well-being. At the same time, Sitra will reinforce its role as a societal educator and networker and intensify its R&D activities. The aim is to enhance Sitra’s strategic agility.

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By the end of 2012, Sitra will adopt a project-based organizational model focused on the implementation of three themes related to sustainable well-being. At the same time, Sitra will reinforce its role as a societal educator and networker and intensify its R&D activities. The aim is to enhance Sitra’s strategic agility.

Sitra strongly believes in its vision that Finland can be successful as a pioneer of sustainable well-being. The dialogue between partners and stakeholders during the strategy reform supports this belief. In connection with the reform, Sitra will sharpen the focus of its activities in order to achieve its vision.

“We consider the simultaneous realisation of experienced well-being and sustainability to be the major challenge of our time. We also believe that responding to this challenge will ensure Finland’s success,” says Mikko Kosonen, Sitra’s President.

While sustainable development has been regarded as one desirable target among many, Kosonen says that it should be elevated to be the most important goal of our society.

“This means that research in sustainable well-being, as well as related experiments and pilots, development and applications, should be promoted, radically and rapidly. Sitra’s revised strategy and operating model are aligned with this goal.”

Sitra to focus on three themes

Since 2004, Sitra’s activities have been based on programmes, currently numbering five. During 2012, Sitra will adopt a project-based organisational model that is focused on three themes: sustainable lifestyles and smart use of natural resources; renewable leadership and well-being services; and bottlenecks of economic growth and new opportunities. The key areas and projects through which the themes are implemented will be defined further in the next few months.

The ongoing programmes will be brought to a close by the end of 2012, and the transition to the theme-based model will be implemented in a flexible and controlled manner. This means that even though Sitra’s activities will no longer be aligned according to programmes, some of the programme’s content and ongoing projects will be continued as separate projects. In connection with the reform, Sitra will also adjust its operating budget to the weakened economic outlook.

Sitra is confident that sharpening its strategic focus will allow it to create increasing added value for society.

”Our goal is to improve our sensitivity by forecasting changes in society and by improving our response to changes in our operating environment,” Kosonen points out. ”With this goal in mind, we will invest resources in research and development in the field of sustainable well-being and reinforce our role as a societal educator and networker in the next few years.”

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